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I really enjoyed this post, Kellen. It is so refreshing to read accounts of strangers being kind and looking out for one another. It was a blessing to me to read this from such a detailed and personal point of view. It reminds me that here is hope for us all as a people. And that maybe, just maybe, some bit of kindness is instinctual. It is very hopeful for me to be reminded that it IS instinctual for people to look out for children and the elderly, even when they are strangers on a bus. It gives me hope for humanity. Sometimes that kind of hope is absent for me. And sometimes not. Your post reminded me greatly of one of my own recent posts and the song that appears at the end of it. Though I am an Agnostic Atheist type, the lyrics that drew me were, "What if God was one of us, just a slob like one of us, just a stranger on the bus trying to make his way home..." The post is here if you want to hear the song.
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http://etherealhighway.blogspot.com/2009/10/for-jenny-who-asked-if-he-really-does.html

I tried to leave another comment on an old post of yours, but I think typepad doesn't allow new comments on old posts, because I was unable. Remember your post titled
'Mindfulness, Childhood Trauma and Denial'? That was the post of yours for which I wanted to leave another commment. It was a true work of art on your part, Kellen. I thank you for it. And your work here on your blog is most certainly NOT in vain. Here is the additional comment I wanted to leave on that post --

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No, Kellen, your work here is NOT in vain. Not at all. I cannot get off this post, and I am trusting myself that there is a valid reason for it. I just posted about this topic on my own blog, and to me it feels relevant to this post of yours and to the things that were pressing on me when I left my previous comment. I think there is a dangerous disconnect between your perception of mindfulness and that which is employed by many therapists. It's too bad there are not more like you. It really, really is... so sad. I hope you are in meaningful contact with many other therapists. They need your honesty and insight very badly. Here is the address for the current post on the topic.
http://etherealhighway.blogspot.com/2009/11/on-time-and-great-dissociators.html

Hi Ethereal,

Thank you so much for your comments. I love that song as well and truly appreciate your feedback. I do talk to a lot of therapists, and hope to talk to a lot more through this blog. I love the internet and the way it makes our world so much "smaller" so that we can more freely communicate ideas and ideals with each other. I think it is the last true democracy, where every voice can be heard with equal importance. Or perhaps it is the first democracy?

You have a great blog and I hope people will take the time to visit the links above.

Peace.

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